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Sublingual



Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence

3.10.2017 | Jessica MacAdam

Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence): learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online ( http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch ) or by phone.

Unless your doctor ls you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

Keep this medication in the packaging it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store buprenorphine or buprenorphine and naloxone at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

Sublingual administration

9.16.2017 | Logan Miers

Sublingual (abbreviated SL), from the Latin for "under the tongue", refers to the pharmacological route of administration by which substances diffuse into the blood through tissues under the tongue.

In 2007, Roder published work showing sublingual immunotherapy with grass pollen is not effective in symptomatic youngsters in primary care. Allergens may also be applied under the tongue, and the FDA is currently reviewing this method of allergen immunotherapy but it is not yet approved in the US.

The sublingual route may also be used for vaccines against various infectious diseases. Thus, preclinical studies have found that sublingual vaccines can be highly immunogenic and may protect against influenza virus and Helicobacter pylori, but sublingual administration may also be used for vaccines against other infectious diseases.

Recently, new technologies have allowed sublingual administration of such molecules.

About Sublingual and Buccal Medication Administration

7.14.2017 | Jessica MacAdam

Sublingual and buccal medication administration are two different ways of giving medication by mouth. Sublingual administration involves placing a drug under your tongue to dissolve and absorb into your blood through the tissue there. Buccal administration involves placing a drug.

Sometimes these drug forms can irritate your mouth. Also ask your doctor how long you need to wait before you can drink and eat after taking the medication. l your doctor right away if this happens to you. l your doctor if you smoke or have open sores in your mouth if they prescribe sublingual or buccal medication for you. For some of these drugs, you can’t drink, swallow, eat, or smoke for some time.

Drugs that are absorbed under the tongue or between the cheek and gum can be easier to take for people who have problems swallowing pills.

What You Should Know About MedicinesSublingual

8.15.2017 | Jessica MacAdam
Sublingual

Some medicines can be given sublingual, which means "under the tongue". The reason for this method of administration is that some medications can enter the bloodstream better or faster this way.

Another example is when a patient in Hospice care is near death, unable to swallow but having pain, the pain medication can be given as a liquid under the tongue, where it is absorbed quickly and gives rapid pain relief.

Some medicines can be given sublingual, which means "under the tongue". The reason for this method of administration is that some medications can enter the bloodstream better or faster this way.

A pharmacist can l you if a certain medication has a coating and absorption profile that will allow this form of administration. A pill designed to be given orally will rarely be able to be administered sublingually.

Approximay 1/3 of an oral dose has the same effects when taken sublingually. An example of a pain medication intended to be taken orally that can be taken sublingually, if you don't mind a slight bitter taste, is hydrocodone. This method of sublingual dosing has been tried when a patient's Dr. does not prescribe enough of the medication in quantity to be taken orally to subdue the patient's severe pain.

A few years ago it was noted that if given sublingual, it would be adequay absorbed, eliminating the need for an injection. For example, B12 is a vitamin that for decades was given as an injection because when someone has Pernicious Anemia they cannot absorb it from the intestines due to a lack of a chemical called intrinsic factor that "grabs" it and pulls it into the bloodstream.

Medical Definition of Sublingual

5.12.2017 | Jessica MacAdam
Sublingual

FacebookTwitterPrint ArticlePrint Page. Sublingual: Underneath the tongue. For example, a sublingual medication is a type of lozenge that is dissolved.

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Medical Definition of Sublingual What Kind of Doctor Do I Need? Slideshow Dental (Oral) Health Quiz Causes of a Heart Attack Slideshow Sublingual: Underneath the tongue. For example, a sublingual medication is a type of lozenge that is dissolved under the tongue.

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